Post(s) tagged with "rachel"

DO THINGS in SUMMERTIME

by Rachel Buse on May 7, 2014

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SUMMERTIME (Source: Rurally Good Festival)

Five things to do this summer:

Make/break’s CSA Delivery Party: (July 1, location TBA) I’m looking forward to the second delivery party for Des Moines’ first ever art share. CSA stands for Community Supported Art. When you buy a share, you get nine pieces of art in three installments. makebreak.us

Art on Dart: This summer (June 26 – Aug. 17), there will be an art exhibition on a DART bus. Local artists Edward Kelley and Emily Newman are partnering with the Greater Des Moines Public Art Foundation to fund this new project. Four artists will make 2-D and 3-D works to be displayed for bus riders during their commute.

Zine Fest: (Aug. 23, Des Moines Social Club’s Viaduct Gallery) Roach Motel Zine Distro (roach-motel.com) is organizing Zine Fest. It will be a day to revel in zine madness: Trade ‘em, make ‘em and meet the people behind these self-published works of art. Rent a booth for $10, and share your zines with all.

Portrait Studio & The Ones We Love: (Aug. 15-31) Des Moines Social Club’s Viaduct Gallery. Two exhibitions are joining forces to celebrate the age-old tradition of attempting to capture someone’s likeness. The Ones We Love (theoneswelove.net) is a group show curated by Lindley Warren. Portrait Studio is a collaborative project sponsored by Cat Rocketship, Jon Pearson and myself. portraitstudioworkshop.com

Rurally Good Festival: (Aug. 2) Grin City Collective, Grinnell. An all-day art/music/farm festival at the Grin City Collective. Camping is encouraged. Grin City is an artist residency and is one of my favorite Iowa things. Last year there was a bow and arrow sound performance, a resident artist writing personal letters from you to your loved ones or whoever, a wonderful breakfast feast and bonfire. rurallygoodfestival.com

This was printed in the Juice

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"Etchasketchathon" Gallery Guide

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"A little elephant works earnestly on a canvas we cannot see." From the gallery guide.

In prepping to give a tour at the Des Moines Art Center, I read up on the current print exhibition, “Etchasketchathon”. From the gallery guide:

Dinos and Jake Chapman—brothers who work as an artistic duo—explore human depravity, cruelty, and art’s power to provoke by making sculptures, installations, and prints in which cuteness, macabre imagery, and in-your-face outright tastelessness exist side by side.

The etchings in “Etchasketchathon” are simultaneously horrifying and cute. A vulture perched on a tree branch surveys a pile of sweet children’s heads (11); in another, a rabbit dressed in an apron holds the decapitated head of a small deer while a turtle looks on (26). The Chapmans do not use images of animals, children, and child’s play because children are adorable but because they re-enact violence in their play and because fairy tales and nightmares deal with life’s terrors.

Read the whole thing here. Also watch this video of Jake and Dionos Champman’s “Fucking Hell”. 

"Etchasketchathon" is on view for free at the Des Moines Art Center from now until May 18, 2014. Recommended.

Rachel Buse makes sculpture.  WEBSITE

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Easy come, easy go…

Pop up, Ames! Design on Main, Ames IA

December 14, 2013

Angela Dunkin

Response by Rachel Buse

Last month, Ames’s Cart organized a pop up exhibition called Pop Up, Ames! They invited artists from Ames and surrounding areas to submit a piece for the show, all works accepted. Over 70 artists sprang at the opportunity. 

Ben Witmer

In the afternoon before the reception, event organizers Tiberiu Chelcea and Lyndsay Nissen, installed works in semi-salon fashion along the walls, sculptures sat on pedestals with videos near the back. The show was packed. Lots to explore. I spent the evening visiting with both familiar and unfamiliar faces. Pop Up, Ames! provided a crossing ground for artists to meet other artists. It helped introduce who is who and who’s making what. You got to see what turns on the other makers within our small geographic region.

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Lyndsay Nissen

Deb Anders-Bond

Mitchell Squire

Kathryn Corones

A range of mediums, subject matter and craft were present. On first glance, the group of work appeared disparate. Then, loose patterns and associations began to emerge. I started to see themes exploring food, sexuality, joy, non sexual nudity, collecting stuff, identity, nostalgia, weather, pop culture, place and cats. Narratives about what it means to be an artist living and making work in central Iowa were conveniently woven from the close proximity of the tight installation. 

Notable: Kathyrn Corones’ lesbian garden of eden hung above the thermostat. Bob Ander’s installation Pick you Poison created from his collection of clock radios, each quietly picking up local air waves creating a barely audible hum. Lyndsay Nissen’s video of herself stumbling into a kitchen, tearing through the fridge nude in the light of an old barn projection. See more photos of all the works here.

Bob Anders

At the end of the night, the show closed. The artworks got picked up and taken back into hiding until the next opportunity presents it’s self for sharing. The event was a massive show and tell. Ames Cart aims to make this an annual or biannual occurrence. Leaving the show, I was inspired by the function of the pop-up’s open call and short timeline alotted for planning, installing and viewing the show. It cracked open expectations of what you can do with an exhibition opportunity. Made it lighter, invited you to showcase your best work or maybe test something experimental on a crowd. The residual feeling from the show was reminiscent of the energy that came from the 2011 Sensory Overload pop up at the Whitter building in Des Moines. Here’s to more madness and spontaneity. 

Rachel Buse makes sculpture.  WEBSITE

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Waiting on Purpose

Peter Goché “Field Notes”, Transient Gallery

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Goché’s ”Metal and Ink 1” (Source: Rachel Buse)

Response by Rachel Buse 

December 12, 2013

Towards the assemblages in this show, I feel an emotional weight of purpose tied to the identity of each object.

Peter Goché collected these bits (a bird skull, porcelain, old sack and scrap metal) from a field which he frequents. Each thing was in a state of no longer being needed. Either broken or lost, their uses were suspended until recently being picked up, and taken forward. Now they function as compositional scribbles, found lines and focal points.  

Initially, I almost overlooked the found bits’ individuality. I didn’t consider where they came from and accepted them as common, straightforward discarded things employed as formal elements in a picture plane. They create the foreground by being tacked to the surface of plywood, matched with an oily black void. They themselves barely altered.

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Rainbow inducing light source beneath Goché’s ”Labor’s leftovers: beneath the obscurity of light” (Source: Rachel Buse)

By identifying with the object, I imagine them being frustrated in their new position. They are given a new role, but can’t quite shed their past. They were designed to be a thing, to do something. Now it’s like “Oh hey, I’m a dull rusty squiggle blocking your view of the luxe shiny blackness.” And not only was the black shiny, it also had rainbows swirling about inside. A raking light installed beneath the big one to reveal the iridescence. In the gallery I heard multiple times, “Do you see the rainbow?”

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Goché’s “Corvine Caw” (Source: Rachel Buse)

I feel kind of sad about these found things. They have character and chrisima, but who are they now? The feeling is linked more to a sadness of inevitable loss. This heightens when you come face to face with the entangled old twisted piece of steal with a hanging crucifix at face level. When abandoned, had the cross ceased functioning for it’s pervious owner? Above it is the bird skull. What was it like when the skull stop functioning for the bird? Life, death, spirituality, rainbows, what-is-the-purposeness of things now all swirling about in my head.

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Goché’s adjustable “Adjust” (Source: Rachel Buse)

My favorite piece was the most hopeful in these series of thoughts. It looked to me like some unused ceiling/archway beams leaning and propped into a corner. They looked ready to be used for their destined function, yet content and at rest. Not on stage suffering an awkward performance. There was no excess, confusion or loss. They hadn’t lived yet, and they are ready and able when needed. I thought maybe they were the rainbow, pre-rainbow before the colors filled in.

Transient Gallery exists in what was an under used office space in the Nestcraft Studio in West Des Moines. Matt Grenier is the driving force behind the shows planned for this small, private space. To see the current show, call Matt for a viewing appointment: (515) 782-0507

Rachel Buse makes sculpture.  WEBSITE

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Zines coming around the bend.

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The zine suitcase received a structural upgrade to compensate for the multitude of zines being made.

Event recap from Rachel

May 17, 2013

The Zine Suitcase is headed to Market Day tomorrow. It will also be at next weeks Art Friends event. The price to take some is to make some. Everything in the suitcase is up for grabs. Many new gems were created during March’s Zine Zowee. There are also stickers and a few hand made sketchbooks to be had. 

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Layla and her gramps working diligently (right).

Evidence over the social media reveals many participants continuing to zine in their individual lives. Please enjoy some pleasing images from the newest crop of zines and links to the genius makers who made them:

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RUA ARNOLD <———DOWNLOAD FULL COLOR PDF

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DEREK ARNOLD <———DOWNLOAD FULL COLOR PDF

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MICKEY DAVIS

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RYAN HANSEN

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GOOD KID ROB

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JON PEARSON (LEFT), CAT ROCKETSHIP (RIGHT)

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imageTwo high school student contributions from our trip to Lamoni.

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AVALAN WILSON

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Rob, Derek and Rua! (left to right)

At the next Art Friends event, expect zine making, french press coffee, some art supplies and a room full of makers. Bring works in progress to work on, draw from the figure, make a collage…. How you take advantage of the time is up to you. Hope to see ya. Bring your friends.

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FACEBOOK EVENT

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A small yellow painting wears a bra.

Holly Wist’s Interjections, Scottish Rite Park

April 2 - 30, 2013

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Wist’s “Interjection with Monogram” Photo: Jon Pearson

Review by Rachel Buse

April 12, 2013

In a small art gallery in the belly of Scottish Rite Park senior living, Holly Wist hosted a tea party and revealed her latest series of paintings, “Interjections”. The journey to this tiny room is littered in muted tones. In the gallery, Wist’s paintings are small and loud. Her colors are bright. The use of acidic yellow is particularly arresting. I asked Wist about the choice of color and she directed me to this video:

Many of the canvases are “wearing” bras. They are painted on. Some are of the backside, where you see the hook and eye closures. One is composed under the armpit, exposing a bit of hand embroidery. Flesh is implied through a plane of bright color being held by the structural personality of each brazier.

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Wist’s “Interjection with lace” Photo: Jon Pearson

I saw these bras as having a caring and supportive relationship with the body they are intended to hold. Floral accents direct subtle attention and thoughtfulness to the individual bras. At the tea party, Wist recalled when her mother surprised her with a bit of embroidery on the cuff of her jacket. A simple gesture motivated by a powerful intention of caring. 

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Wist’s statement Photo: Rachel Buse

Wist’s “Interjections” is both defiant and compassionate.  Her statement both acknowledges and reacts to assumed expectations tied to being an artist, a lady and a person. Even though you’ve missed the tea party, you can still have your interjection with the bras.

"Interjections" run through April 30th. Visit the Scottish Rite Park Art Gallery which is open Monday thru Friday 8 AM - 5 PM. Go in the front door walk down the hallway to the right, the gallery will be on your left hand side.

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David Byrne spilled the beans.

Playing the Building, Minneapolis, MN

December 1, 2012

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Response by Rachel

February 26, 2013

Yesterday, it was discovered that David Byrne & St. Vincent will be performing this year at 80/35. In honor of this news, I want to share with you some recent documentation of an installation by David Byrne called Playing the Building. In various locations, Byrne temporarily attaches an organ to a large building in ways to make it sing, gyrate and whistle. At the Aria building in Minneapolis, Byrne transformed this event space into an interactive instrument. The installation invites you to play the building.

Byrne: …nobody is better at playing it than anyone else.  A six-year-old kid is as good as a trained composer or a trained musician.  So people sometimes get the mistaken idea that “Oh, oh, I can’t do this because I’m not a musician and it’s a keyboard” but then they see kids jumping down on it and people who are obviously not trained musicians and pretty soon everybody realizes that really no one’s any better at it.  It’s this leveling thing where everybody, all of a sudden, becomes a musician, of sorts anyway. Read more.

Hear a bit of the sound of Aria.

Byrne: All the super structure of the building is kind of hidden in most modern buildings.  But in these older buildings, some of that is sort of visible and especially these older buildings that have been kind of renovated or gone through a number of life cycles, various parts of that stuff tends to be exposed.  And the piece kind of makes it evident what those things are.  And I find it exciting for people.  They hit a key and they hear a sound coming from part of a building that’s thirty yards away and then the next sound comes from over on the right and the next sound is over on the left and the next one’s here and one’s far away.  And the things that they’re playing are all around them.  Read more.

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Photos and Video by Rachel


Sitting at the organ was like taking the seat on a throne. You could play for as long as you like. You can experiment with the highs and lows of the building. Pound on it. Attempt to make sense of the sounds you are making. I particularly liked the hammer-pounding keys. It was the most visual reaction of sound making. The installation of wires spewing out the back of the organ lead you to the edges of the room, exploring what they were attached to. It was glorious.

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The Odd Collection of Jennifer Argus

Magpie Tendencies, Anderson Gallery

January 18 - February 22, 2013

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Bell jar installation. Photo: Rachel Buse

Review by Rachel

February 19, 2013

Prepare for an eyeful. The Anderson this month has been dipped in sepia tones and transformed into a Victorian era cabinet of curiosities. Artist, Jennifer Argus, is playing out her obsessive fantasies without restraint. There are thousands of details in the show. The walls have been intricately wallpapered. Tiny houses under glass are raised up on stilts, inviting you to peak in on the worlds inside. Bell jars, a library card catalog and Japanese jewelry boxes also house various arrangements and combinations of this artist’s particular collection. 

(BELOW) View of Magpie Tendencies when you enter the gallery. Photo: Rich Sanders/ Sanders Photographics

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Beeswax Cemetery. Photo: Rachel Buse

There is something about this show that really “bugs” me. The houses are coated in beeswax. Hundreds of small sculptures lined up along the wall and within the glass cases are cast from beeswax. The theme of multiplication is prevelent. The power of many over one. And what does it mean to be one of many? How does one adorn oneself in an effort to stand out among the pack?

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Wallpaper installation with custom bottom boarder. Photo: Rachel Buse

Argus’s narratives seem to come alive before my eyes. They especially do in the two jerky animation shorts looping in the back. The characters start to interact and develop competitive egos. Drama ensues while the audio of a continuous circus score hypnotizes you. There is something about a moving image that takes you further into her fantasy. Realize in all of this make believe and magic that everything is very much dead. The dominant personalities are a farce. Argus is playing dress up and decorating.

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COLORED ART SANDS borrowed from State Historical Society Photo: Rachel Buse

Two of the vignettes were designed around sand art and 100-year-old taxidermy birds borrowed from the private collection at the State Historical Society. Another story takes on a Plant of the Apes type of situation. Sealing these small narratives under glass surrounded by rich old wood, or wood made to look rich and old, elevates the delicate nature of the objects on display. However, modern touches like brightly colored felt balls and plastic mini-stripper figurines take the work somewhere else, somewhere silly.

After a full hour of marinating in this exhibition, I’m looking forward to the closing reception this Friday. Jennifer Argus will be in town talking about the show. There is a lovely publication made for this exhibition with two essays responding to Argus’s work. Also in the back is The Wonder Room built by Drake Students. The show is rich, entertaining and impressive. Don’t deny your eyes.

SHOW CLOSES FRIDAY 22. Closing reception and gallery talk info here.

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DOUBLE-LUSTRON DEATH

4111 Tonawanda, Des Moines IA

Demolished February 14, 2013 9:00 AM

A summary of photos and articles documenting recent abuse of a local historic landmark. -The Home Explorer

Video: Steve Wilke Shapiro

Hud Weeks’ former residence, the irreplaceable double-Lustron next to Salisbury House was demolished yesterday.  DeCarlo had commenced demolition by 9 am, much to the chagrin of Salisbury House staff when they sent out the “alarm”.  The demo permit was issued over the counter at about 11:30. 

For your online viewing pleasure - 

"Yesterday morning, I had a doctor’s appointment, so I arrived at Salisbury House around 9:40, two and half hours later than my normal early bird tendencies get me here. Literally, as I opened my car door, I heard a tremendous smashing sound, and looked west … just in time to see a huge backhoe drive straight into Hud’s house with its arm swinging. The garage had already been knocked down at this point, and the Lustron and atrium portions of the house were flattened in less than 30 minutes, the prefabricated materials easily scattered by the power of the backhoe’s arm. Only the pool house remained." Read More.

What is a Lustron?

Who originally built and lived in the double-Lustron?

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Nellie and Hud Weeks, 1938. (Photo courtesy Cooper Weeks). Photo:Salisbury House

Hud was an avid outdoorsman, pilot and speedboat racer. He married Ellen “Nellie” Cooper — the daughter of legendary speedboater Jack “Pop” Cooper and a record setting racer in her own right — in 1938, and the young couple moved into the gardener’s cottage at Salisbury House (now our Visitors Center and Gift Shop) by 1940. Around 1950, Carl and Edith Weeks subdivided their original Salisbury House property to produce a 2.5 acre lot at the western end, separated from the main house by a deep ravine, for Hud and his family (now including son Cooper and daughter Barbara) to build their own home, a task to which Hud applied his usual exuberance and creative elan. 

The following photos were taken January 19, 2013. Death Date: February 14th, 2013.

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

Plan to be at the Feb. 25 City Council meeting - 4:30 in City Hall - 
 
"In light of these recent developments, I have submitted a request to speak before the Des Moines City Council at its meeting Feb. 25, 2013 regarding issues surrounding historic preservation in Des Moines. If you are saddened or even outraged that this was allowed to happen, please plan to attend the Council meeting in support. Now more than ever we need to show solidarity and strength in numbers to bring awareness that Des Moines history is important…and worth saving.
 
Best Regards,
Sarah Oltrogge - President, Des Moines Historical Society”
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Kaloyan Ivanov found SOMATOTOPIA

SOMATOTOPIA, Public One Space, Iowa City

December 7, 2012

Response by Rachel

February 11, 2013

The video above brings us back to an evening last December where I ventured to Iowa City to join forces with Kaloyan Ivanov to perfom “Void Simulacrum”. He brought this piece from Brooklyn for the opening of Public One Space’s opening of SOMATOTOPIA, an international, touchable art show. Relive my experience in the void and enjoy a conversation with K himself. The following photos give you a peak into the other pieces on display that evening. Some failed while others enticed. Texture, taste, smell and skill were used to promote interaction with the objects displayed.  

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Book-form paintings by Josh Doster. The board with the inset circles had some squishy moments. Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Matt Steele’s “that you always feel happy & bright” Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Tiberiu Chelcea made prints from the opening attendees footsteps. Photo: Rachel Buse

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Suckle warm milk from eye droppers while watching Tiffany Sinnott’s “Oxy suckle rock 2” Photo: Rachel Buse

 Video from the opening. Posted by Public One Space.

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Those headphones on the right hand side gave you a feeling of a spider tickling your ear. They were made by Irina Danilova she calls them “Tactile Sonata”. Photo: Rachel Buse

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Final display of Void Simulacrum. Rock texture a brilliant addition by show curator, Kalmia Strong. Photo: Rachel Buse

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